jeanne_moore

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  • in reply to: Week 47 Check-in #44761
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl, Mona and all!

    I’m still editing. My first-round edit of my contemporary women’s fiction is almost done. Then I have a lot more work to do. It needs a final chapter or two to tie it up and bring it to a close, but I needed to do the first-round pass over to see what I have. I’m a pantser and don’t outline before writing. I’ve now found it to be an effective routine that while I’m doing the first round edit, I do a chapter by chapter summary in a separate document. Each chapter summarizes scene by scene what happens and whose POV each scene is from. I think this will help me with the future edits.

    I got the idea to do this in the last historical novel I wrote because my beta reader said she had a hard time figuring how how much time had passed from scene to scene. So, I went through the manuscript and did a chapter-by-chapter, scene-by-scene summary so I could more objectively see what I had.

    I’m also working on continuing to edit the two collections of short stories that I will be self publishing.

    I also have two separate ideas for historical novels and have done a little research on each idea. Don’t know when I’ll get around to working on those.

    So, for the time being, it’s more editing.

    Jeanne

     

     

    in reply to: Week 47 Check-in #44760
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Sending you hugs, Mona!

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 46 Check-in #44662
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl and everyone!

    I am still working on editing and not doing any new writing.

    I have a contemporary women’s fiction that I’d let sit for quite a while because I didn’t know how I was going to get from where I’d stopped to where I wanted the end to be. I’m not doing Nano, but Beth Daniels’ workshop on preparing for it helped me finish this WIP. Building on her suggestions, I thought about what it was that I wanted to happen to bring the story to it’s conclusion and then I had to think up what episodes had to happen to bring the story to the conclusion I wanted. So, I was able to finish it. Mostly. After I’ve gone over it the first time and see what I’ve got, I’ll have to come up with a final chapter that will tie everything together.

    I’m a pantser and as I go over each chapter, I’m also making a chapter by chapter outline so I can see what I’ve got. I think this way I’ll be able to see what I need to add, fix, and what the last chapter will have to be to tie things up.

    The other thing I’m still working on is the collection of six short stories I wrote that I will be publishing on Amazon.

    I took Alessandra Torre’s Goodreads workshop today. It was interesting, but I’m still not enthusiastic about Goodreads. I feel like those who are saying it’s such a wonderful marketing site for authors are trying to convince me that the naked emperor is wearing clothes. Maybe I’m missing something?

    Well, that was my week. More editing coming up this week.

    Have a great week and take care everyone.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 46 Check-in #44661
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Wow, Kathy, you had a full plate! I hope things are better now. I think you did a good job getting some writing done.

    Hope things are better now.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 45 Check-in #44599
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl,

    I put together an article-type thing on what I’ve learned about copyrights. I’m attaching it in case you want to look at it. It’s a draft. I’ve read it over a couple of times but that doesn’t mean there aren’t some typos in it. Not sure what I’m going to do with it after I’ve gotten it into it’s final proof-read form. Submit it to RWA’s magazine?

    I’ll look into Alessandra Torre. I’m not too sure I like Goodreads. So far, as far as social media goes, I like Facebook and Twitter the best. I’m not even crazy about Instagram. I used to like Linkedin, but hadn’t used it in a long time and when I went back to it again, it was different. I find it much harder to navigate now.

    I was hoping Goodreads would be a good way to market my books, but I just don’t see that it is. There are just too many authors on there all vying for attention. Seems to me that if there are millions of authors on there, each one of us just becomes a needle in a haystack.

    Anyway, if you or any of the members who participate in this forum would like to take a look at and comment on my copyright document, I’d appreciate feedback.

    Have a great rest of the week.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 45 Check-in #44569
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl and everyone!

    I’m a little late in posting this week for last week. Last week, I finished editing (for the 15th time), the Christmas story (a short story) that I was getting ready to publish on Amazon through KDP.  And I did publish it; I also copyrighted it.

    I thought I was so smart using the Standard Application to register the copyright, but I should have done a little more reading as to the different applications. Not that what I did was totally wrong – it’s still get copyrighted, but if I’d paid a little more attention, I would have looked into the application to Register One Work by One Author.  This can be one poem, one short story, one photograph, among other things. And the registration fee is $45, whereas the fee for the Standard Application is $65.00.

    So, I cost myself an extra $20. Next time, I’ll know. But I don’t know if I’ll be registering just one short story again. I wanted to get this one in before Christmas as it’s a Christmas story.

    My other short stories are going to go in as a collection (it’s an anthology when the short stories are by different authors and a collection when they’re by the same author). I already got a determination from the Copyright Office that for a case like this, use the Standard Application. The registration fee for this is $65.00.

    If you have a group of short stories that you want to publish individually, you can copyright up to 10 with the same application (Register a Group of Unpublished Works); the registration fee is $65.

    I also signed up for an Author Account on Goodreads because I keep reading that’s a great place to get reviews for your books and to advertise. Now that I see it, I’m wondering about that, though. there are zillions of posts across numerous discussion groups and they start with the oldest entry to the newest entry. Took me a while when I posted to figure out where my post went. It was at the end of 50 pages (or some such high number), the post is small, the cover photo of my book was small. How’s any one going to find MY post. It’s a needle in a haystack. Maybe there’s some trick to getting noticed on Goodreads, but I’ve only been a member one day and haven’t figured it out yet.

    Well, on to this week. For me, this week is continuing to edit and proof the six historical short stories for my “Stories of Hope” Collection that I will be publishing on Amazon.

    Have a wonderful week, everyone. Hugs, Mona. I send you much love.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 45 Check-in #44567
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Mona,

    I send you my condolences and also much love and many hugs.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Lesson 2 – Glossary #44517
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Thank you, Barb. I’m saving this.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 44 Check-in #44483
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl and all,

    I’ve been really busy. Published an informational pamphlet through KDP on Amazon. It’s called On Vacation in an Emergency and it lists hospitals/emergency rooms. urgent care and walk in clinics and pharmacies for people who are planning on vacationing in Waikiki/Honolulu. I found a really cute picture of a little girl sitting on an examining table in a doctor’s office in the Cover Create function on KDP. I’mall for not having to pay for cover art if I can help it. It’s an eBook only since its only 10 pages. I don’t think it’s worth doing a paperback of this.

    Now, I’m working on editing and proofing a short story (23 pages) that I’m going to copyright and then publish as an eBook through KDP.  I want to get it published no later than the day after Thanksgiving in time for Christmas as it has a Christmas theme. I will go in the Short Reads category.

    I’m starting to think about marketing. I found out about the hashtags #writerslift, #writingcommunity and #writerscommunity on Twitter and am using them to make contact with other writers to follow and they follow me back. That way, when I post Tweets, they are seen by whoever is following me and I Tweet about not only my writing activity but about social things as well. I forget where I read that it’s a good idea on social media for writers to make contacts that will see what you post in regard to your writing and also what you publish.

    Well, I guess we have to wait to find out who won the election until tomorrow morning. I’m totally sick of politics.

    Take care and stay safe.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 43 Check-in #44411
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Sounds like you had a good week, Cheryl. Your trailer sounds like fun.

    How did you find out your story was in Short Reads? I know authors can’t elect to be in this category, that KDP just puts you there. Do they let you know when you’re in Short Reads?

    I am keeping notes on everything I find out about copyrighting and will put them together in some kind of organized manner.

    The question I’m waiting on an answer for right now involves an informational pamphlet I’ve put together on medical information for visitors to Waikiki  – not that tourism is starting to open up again. It lists hospitals/emergency rooms, urgent-care clinics and walk-in clinics in Waikiki, pharmacies in Waikiki and within easy commuting distance from Waikiki, and emergency dental services. Since all the information in this pamphlet is public information that I found on the internet in the various establishments websites, I’m wondering if this pamphlet can be copyrighted.  Also, if I may have to update it periodically to keep the information current, I wonder, if I can copyright it, would I have to copyright it ever time I updated information.

    I tried doing a live chat with the copyright office on this, but the specialist helping me said it was beyond the scope of her knowledge. She gave me a phone number to call, but after being on hold for 20 minutes, I gave up and just sent them a message through their website.

    The copyright office has some really good tutorials on YouTube.

    Between KDP and the Copyright Office, I’m learning the importance of asking questions as part of the learning process.

    Have a good week and stay safe.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 43 Check-in #44396
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl and all!

    My word count was still low this week, but I didn’t write anything much new as I am still going through proof reading and edits for the 6 stories that will go into my short story collection that I will be publishing on Amazon. And now that tourism is starting to open up again I’m compiling information for a pamphlet on emergency medical services for visitors who will be staying in Waikiki. I intend on publishing both the collection of short stories and the pamphlet on Amazon.

    I’ve also been contacting the U. S. Copyright office with lots of questions.

    I found out something very interesting. For those of you who like to write short stories and also nonfiction articles, KDP/Amazon has a category called “Short Reads.” They are not publicizing it and I don’t remember how I found out about it. But I did contact KDP to inquire and was informed that yes, it is a new category, but they are not advertising it. You can’t apply or submit to this category; KDP/Amazon makes the determination that a story or nonfiction piece or collection of poetry falls within this category based on how long it might take to read it. They’re using as estimate of 15 minutes as a guideline. Also, it can be anywhere from one page (based on an average of 250 words per page) to 100 pages.  So, if you write short stories or articles or opinion pieces or poems, or short whatever, you don’t have to bundle several into a collection (like I thought I had to do). You can publish them individually.

    Thanks to Beth Daniels’ Nano course, I’ve been able to progress with two WIPs that were just sitting on my hard drive because I couldn’t figure out how to move them to the end. I got a lot out of this workshop.

    Until next week, everyone stay safe and stay well.

    Jeanne

     

    in reply to: NANO PREP Lect #8 Monday Oct 26 #44395
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Beth,

    Yes, I agree – writer’s blocks are just a matter of not knowing what’s going to happen next in a story. For me, that’s an important take-a-way from this workshop.

    The other thing you wrote that really helped me was when I wrote that I was stuck with the historical novel about the troupe of family actors that gets robbed and stranded in small-town Central California. That maybe it’s not a romance after all, and in that case I have to decide what it is. The other things were what genre do I want the story to be and what has to happen to bring the story to completion.

    I took from that something that I was able to use to bring the contemporary women’s fiction that I’m writing to a close. I was so close to the end but didn’t know how to finish it. And the question I had to ask was what had to happen to get the main female character to realize that the main male character was the man for her – and had been all along even through she hadn’t realized it before?  And I was able to write it.

    Don’t know if Ill do Nano this year, but I’m much closer to completing this contemporary women’s fiction that I was before and also, I’ll now be able to work on the historical fiction. Maybe that one’s women’s fiction, too.

    And I’ve got the contemporary coming of age story hanging there on my hard drive. Question to myself – where to I want to go with this and what has to happen to get there?

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 42 Check-in #44324
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl,

    I hope this post finds you well and productive.

    This  past week, my word count is way down because my main goal is to proof read and edit two more collections of short stories and a historical women’s fiction novel-length work that I’ve had sitting for a few months waiting for me to look at it again. Even though I put much effort into that novel-length work (I did 10 pass overs, each one editing for a different issue), I’m finding minor stuff like quotation marks at the end a few sentences that aren’t dialogue, one place where a word was left out, and  another place where a word was typed in twice. I’m also finding places where the sentence order needed to be moved around to make the paragraph flow better.  And there are places where I’m adding a little more to show how the characters felt or reacted.

    I want to have these three works done by the end of November or the middle of December so I can copyright them before self publishing them. If I read the instructions on the Copyright Office’s website, I think I can register all three for one fee by using the application for a group of unpublished works. I will contact the Copyright office when they’re open during the week to verify this.

    I did put in the application to register a  copyright  for one of the collections of short stories (the longer one) that I published on Amazon this past week. For a published work, I had to use the Standard Application. Even though they say work is copyrighted from the moment the words go on the paper, I want to have the documentation in case I ever need it.

    A secondary goal is to finish up the contemporary women’s fiction and the historical women’s fiction I’ve left sitting on my hard drive for months. Thanks to Beth Daniel’s Nano class, I made myself decide what needs to happen for both of those to finish them.

    Then, I have one more novel that’s maybe a coming of age story that’s unfinished. I thought it was going to be a romance, but it didn’t work out that way. Maybe I will come back to that on when I’ve finished my other projects.

    For now, my goal is to get the ones that are finished to the point where I’m ready to publish them, get the application in to register the copyright and then do the work of formatting so they can be published.

    I’m busier now than before COVID-19 when I could come and go as I pleased.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: NANO ACT: Lecture #5 Thursday, Oct 15 #44268
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Beth

    This lesson is quite helpful to me for my historical novel that I was working on in the last workshop I took with you. This is the one with traveling actors (the O’Neal family) who got robbed and stranded in a small Central California town while they were traveling from their last engagement in Virginia City, Nevada to their next one in Calaveras, California. Where I got hung up was with why they would end up wanting to stay in this small town when they enjoyed the life they had.

    I left off a the beginning of Chapter 16 with a word count of 40,000 words.

    Briefly, my ideas for what’s going to have to happen next if they’re going to stay in this little town instead of traveling on are. I have not assigned what’s going to happen in each of the remaining chapters that need to be written.

    • <span style=”font-weight: 400;”>Before they have a chance to put on their play, another fire breaks out in the bank  (there was already one fire that broke out in the bank). It spreads to the town hall where they were going to have the play and the doctor’s office. All three buildings are unusable and will have to be rebuilt.</span>
    • <span style=”font-weight: 400;”>The arsonist is caught. He has to be removed and sent to another jurisdiction for trial as the sheriff determines that he will not get a fair trial in Rainbow Junction.</span>
    • <span style=”font-weight: 400;”>The gang that robbed the O’Neals is apprehended; the family’s $5,000 is recovered. </span>
    • <span style=”font-weight: 400;”>They and the Captain John Davis and his wife (two residents of the town) and the town’s people fund a theater that they will own and they put on their play.</span>
    • <span style=”font-weight: 400;”>The O’Neals become the foundation of the Rainbow Junction Theatre’s resident repertory company.</span>
    • <span style=”font-weight: 400;”>The story ends with Piper O’Neal and Caleb McKenzie (the two main characters) romantically interested in each other.  Caleb’s father Joseph and widow Consuelo Lang who owns the boarding house will also be romantically interested in each other so I’ve got to go back into what’s already been written to show that they are attracted to each other.</span>

     

    Phew. This is a relief. This story’s been sitting around for quite a while.

    Jeanne

     

    in reply to: GETTING NANO TOGETHER Lect #4 Mon Oct 12 #44232
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Beth!

    I’ve got a contemporary woman’s with 60,000 words written and I need to bring it to a conclusion and ending. It’s just been sitting on my hard drive because although I know  how I want it to end, I’ve been procrastinating on it. In the meantime, I’ve self published two collections of short romances (each story is 800 words or less), have written 6 longer short stories (4,000 to 10,000 word) that will be a collection and have three more short stories and working on two more that will be another collection.

    But the contemporary woman’s fiction is just sitting there. I, too, am a pantser. I have a general idea of what ‘s going to happen, but have been putting off just sitting down and writing. And I’ve found that’s how my ideas come to me for incidents and events that will move the story to an ending – just sit down and write.

    I’m now going to look at the download you gave us with this lesson using the general ideas and attempt to turn them into specifics that will help me get this novel finished.

    My historical novel that I was writing along with the last workshop I took with you is just sitting there unfinished too. Maybe I need to do this technique with that one, too. It’s taken a bit of a different direction than I had intended. Maybe I need to rethink the genre. It’s not a romance, that’s for sure.

    Hope you’re doing well and staying safe.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 40 Check-in #44105
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl,

    I know – flash fiction is a challenge. It’s a challenge getting in the essentials of your story into 1,000 words or less. I had lots of practice writing short romances to submit to Woman’s World Magazine. I submitted 75 stories to that magazine and they only bought one.  A collection of some of those stories will be going on Amazon. 

    While flash fiction is anything under 1,000 words, “short” fiction is typically 6,000 words or less. I seem to be able to get in what I need to in around 4,000 to 6,000 words.  With the ones I’m writing there are typically two major incidents – the inciting incident and the incident that brings the story to it’s conclusion, with some stuff in between. I call those middle incidents, the “traveling” incidents – they move the story from the inciting incident to the ending incident. That’s just my own term that I made up.

    Well, that’s it for today. I’m working on reading my proof copy for the paperback format for my collection of short romances. Found some mistakes. Darn it, that means that what I posted for the ebook also has the same mistakes in it. Thy are minor. I kinda don’t feel like going through the Kindle Create process for that again, but I’ll think about it.

    Well, back to work.

    Hope you and everyone in the group are having a good week.

    Jeanne

     

    in reply to: Session 8 – Quick Tips for better dialogue #44090
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Thank you so much for this session, Allie. It’s been so helpful to me! So has your encouragement!

    Aloha from Honolulu,

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 40 Check-in #44069
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    The one thing I did this week and plan to do next week to move me toward my goal is to finish my short story the latest short story I’m writing.” It is story number six intended for my short-story collection. Also, my my goals for next wet week includes beginning several rounds of proof reading, editing and rewriting these six stories. They are all historical stories and deal with hope. When I’ve completed story number 6’s draft, the total word count for all six will be around 40,000 words.

    After getting this collection of stories finished, polished and published on Amazon, I have to contemporary short stories that have elements of the possibility of love waiting to be included in another collection.

    As you pointed out earlier, Cheryl, I really think I’ve found my niche in short stories. I like not having to find enough crises and events to sustain the story over 70,000 to 95,000 words. And I’m finding it’s easier to edit and rewrite each story that’s shorter. I’ve got two novels sitting on my computer waiting to be finished and a completed one that I need to proof read once more, but I’ve been so caught up in the short stories, I haven’t gotten around to them.

    This week, I averaged 5 to 6 hours writing-related activities and averaged around 1800 words a day.

    On the “housekeeping front, I finally figured out how to format a paperback in Word for Kindle Direct Publishing.  I practiced on my collection of romances (that I wrote for Women’s World that they didn’t buy) and also on my completed novel that’s waiting to be proof read once more.

    Several months ago I took an online course on self publishing (before I actually decided to do it). This afternoon, I went to the instructor’s website to see if she had any info I’d be interested in. Come to find out, she offers a service to format manuscripts for paperback for KDP/Amazon and charges $75.00 for what I can now do for myself. Maybe when I’ve done this enough for myself that I feel confident that I can do it for others, maybe I can go into business and charge for it!

    So, it was a good week.

    Jeanne

     

     

    in reply to: Week 39 Check-in #43994
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl and all,

    So far, I haven’t made it to the sprints, but I am keeping myself busy keeping  my nose to the grindstone. I averaged writing 6 hours a day last week (remember I’m retired and don’t have to work a 40-hour week at something besides writing). That included writing first drafts, editing, and practicing using Kindle Direct Publishing. Between writing first drafts and adding to word count when editing, I did a total of 14, 725 words last week. I don’t know how that compares to prior weeks because I just started keeping track of word count.

    Now that I’m learning to self publish, that’s really a big motivation to keep writing. I love having the control over whether what I write gets published or not.

    Have a good week everyone!

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Week 39 Check-in #43993
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl!

    Sounds like you had a great week. My longest manuscript is 97,000 words, but the rest are between 75,000 and 85,000. Fortunately, that seems to be within the range for romance and women’s fiction.

    in reply to: Session 6 – Surprising your reader #43975
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Sorry, I’m a bit behind. Just realized I haven’t gotten emails for Sessions 6 @ 7. I’ll catch pu.

    in reply to: Week 38 Check-in #43933
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl and all,

    This week’s been productive. I averaged 1562 words per day (10,933 total for 7 days). I am really enjoying writing short stories. The stories I’m writing now are all historical set in the 1800s or early 1900s and I’m coming up with some interesting topics.

    Author Deeann Gist, who writes historical romances, in an interview I watched on YouTube, said that she looks for things that happened in history that a lot of people don’t know about. I decided to to that, too. I just started a short story in which the inciting incident is the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in 1911. And the other one I am writing involves the Orphan Trains. The Children’s Aid Society in New York City took children from orphanages and arranged adoptions by families out west.

    In addition, I have stared taking photographs again and came up with a collection of photos I might want to use for my book covers. I selected a group of them and registered them with the copyright office.  This is the first time I’ve ever registered anything for copyright.

    If any of you in this group are interested in copyrighting your work, whether it be your novels or photographs, I found some really good tutorials on YouTube that the copyright office posted. I can post the links if anyone’s interested. What I did for the photographs is I watched the tutorial once. Then when I was ready to register my photos, I watched and listened again as I went step by step. I’d listen, the pause the vido while I followed the instructions, then when I was ready for the next step, I’d watch and listen to the portion for that step and then do the step, and continued like that until I’d completed all the steps.

    So, in the last 2 weeks or so, I’ve learned how to do two things that I didn’t know how to do before. I learned how to use Kindle Direct Publishing to publish en ebook and put it on Amazon and I learned how to register with the copyright office.

    I am also pulling out of the painful crisis situation that exploded a few weeks ago and have learned a great deal about dealing with adversity and overcoming it. It’s been extremely painful, but I’ve learned a lot.

    Upward and onward.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Lesson 3 – Launching a scene #43916
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Allie,

    You mentioned about accents in your reply to me. With the new short story I’m writing, I have something similar to that to show with dialogue.

    My main character and a couple of the other characters are orphans who’ve had to fend for themselves on the mean streets of New York City in 1910. The story starts when two agents for the Children’s Aid Society discover them in an alley.

    The Children’s Aid Society placed many, many orphaned children in homes “out west” in what we’d call the mid west today. They sent them, with an agent supervising to families on what became known as Orphan Trains.

    I need to establish that my main character is uneducated through her dialogue. She cannot speak with my voice. I’m not sure how to do this except that she would say things like “ain’t” and “it don’t” and drop the final “g” off of words that end in “ing.” I don’t want to get too phony or contrived. I want her speech seem natural, but not be the same voice as I would speak with.

    Any suggestions?

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Session 4 – Lying #43903
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Is there any way to delete this? I posted twice.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by jeanne_moore.
    in reply to: Session 4 – Lying #43901
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    I’m a little late jumping in here. I must have missed the email in my inbox. Anyway, here’s my homework for  Session 4

     

    “Mom.” Jessie walked through The Moonbeam Inn’s reception area and into the back office. Seated at the desk, Mom looked away from the computer screen and smiled.

     

    “Hi, dear. I see you’re wearing your jacket. Going somewhere?”

     

    Jesse’s throat tightened. “Yeah. I’m meeting Bethany at the library. We have a history test to study for.”

     

    Bethany might be at the library, but Jessie had no intention of going there. Until later, maybe.

     

    “Okay, dear. Come home for lunch. Pizza parlor’s off limits, remember?”

     

    Jessie wrinkled her nose. “But why?”

     

    Her mother’s eyebrows arched. “Isn’t that where you said that boy hangs out sometimes? Saturday’s the day kids hang out, isn’t it?”

     

    Jessie plucked at the sleeves of her jacket as if adjusting them. “What boy?”

     

    “The high school boy.”

     

    “There are lots of high-school boys in town.”

     

    Mom tilted her head to the side. “I know that. Oh, what was his name? Carson? Clifton? Conrad?”

     

    “Ohhhh.” Jessie nodded. “You mean Cameron. Cameron Lang.”

     

    Mom glared at her. Jessie gulped.

     

    “Ah, no, I won’t be going to the pizza parlor. You said yourself Clifton–I mean Cameron’s too old for me. He’s sixteen and I’m twelve. I must seem like a child to him.”

     

    “Okay, chatterbox. If you’re going to the library to study for a test, why aren’t you taking any books with you?”

     

    “Oh, thanks for reminding me, Mom. I forgot it. Wouldn’t Bethany be bummed out at me. I’ll go up and get it. It’s okay if I meet Bethany at the library?”

     

    Mom looked over her shoulder. “Hello Bethany. I’m glad to see you here.”

     

    “Hi, Mrs. Dunbar. I’m early, so I thought I’d come get you, Jess. Gee it must be fun living at this inn. I haven’t been inside before.”

     

    Jessie turned, looked at her friend and scowled. Then she smiled. If Bethany hadn’t shown up, maybe mom wouldn’t have let her go.

     

    “Where’s your book, Jessie?”

     

    “I’ll go up to my room and get it and meet you on the front porch.”

     

    Jessie dashed out of the office. She’d find a way to leave the library and go to Paisano’s Pizza Parlor. Maybe Cameron would be there today. How would Mom ever find out? She worked in the inn’s office every day except Sunday. And she always ate lunch at the table in the kitchen when she was working.

     

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by jeanne_moore.
    in reply to: Week 37 Check-in #43868
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Hi, Cheryl,

    Of course my main goal is to get my writing published and actually make some money doing that. I took the plunge, made myself learn how to publish to Amazon through KDP and got two books on Amazon (one was really short – the first one I uploaded was a collection of three short romances and I did this one to actually experience the process). The second one is a collection of 15 short romances. So with that accomplished, I am greatly encouraged.

    I have three sup-goals that I’m working on this week that will eventually be published on Amazon through KDP. They are two contemporary novel-length women’s fiction and also, short stories (longer word count then the short stories I already published)  that will go into a collection called Stories of Hope.”

    This past week, I averaged about 1,500 words a day and 6 hours a day working on different aspects related to writing. Some of the time was spent on actual writing; some of the time was spent on watching videos on different aspects of KDP, and I looked into websites on book cover art and also looked into publishing with Ingram Spark and Draft2Digital.

    KDP by far looks like the least problem free. For me Ingram Spark is out. They charge $49 up front to publish a paperback and ebook and $25 to publish an ebook.  And you pay the fee again if you want to revise, as if it were a new book. They distribute “wide” – as in to more places than just Amazon (like Kobo, Barns & N0ble, etc.).

    Draft2Digital also distributes “wide,” but it doesn’t charge anything up front for publishing with them. It takes 10% of every sale you make. And you have to provide your own cover.

    Right now, I”ll go with Amazon. I have been using their Cover Create and their pre-made cover designs and also Kindle Create, which formats the manuscript for you. And I do well enough editing my short stories that I haven’t hired an editor. So, I’ve paid nothing up front. Right now, this is good enough for me.

    When I get more books published to Amazon, then I’ll look into marketing and an author website.

    But right now, my goals are writing and continuing to learn.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Lesson 3 – Launching a scene #43818
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Here’s mine:

    <span style=”font-weight: 400;”>Pa to Charley: “I have a good mind to burn that damn thing you draw in and all your pencils, too. You’re sixteen years old, too old to be settin’ around day dreamin’ like some silly girl. Get to work. Your chores is waitin’ fer you. The cow is waitin’ to be milked and the horse and mule is waitin’ to be fed. Then you gotta collect the eggs from the hen house. And let the hens out into the yard and feed them. After the mule’s eaten, I’ll hitch him so I can plow the field.”</span>

     

     

    in reply to: Session 2 – Establishing a character (PDF version) #43796
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Allie –

    I see from your profile that you’re the Chunky Method. That’s how I write. Twenty to forty minutes at one time, then go on to something else. Sometimes, if I get really involved, I might write for an hour or so, but rarely go beyond an hour. I reach a “saturation point” after a while.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Session 2 – Establishing a character (PDF version) #43795
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Gee, thanks, Allie, for your complimentary replies. I’m so used to getting responses from agents and publishers – if I get any at all – telling me what they think are the negatives in what I’ve written.

    Your responses are very encouraging to me.

    Jeanne

    in reply to: Session 2 – Establishing a character (PDF version) #43789
    jeanne_moore
    Participant

    Here’s my homework for Session 2

    Barbara shivered, hugged herself and then rubbed her upper arms. What if she failed? Then what would her mother’s sister do with her and Jessica?

    Footsteps padded into the kitchen.

    “What’s wrong, Mama? When’s Daddy coming back to get us out of this place?”

    “Daddy’s not coming back, Jessie. But everything’s going to be okay. We’re going to go live with Aunt Clover.”

    “But I don’t know Aunt Clover. I’ll have to leave my friends.”

    “You’ll love Aunt Clover and you’ll make new friends. And we’re going to live in a wonderful, big old house that’s an inn near the beach.”

    “After summer vacation, I’ll have to go to a new school.”

    “I went to school in Moonbeam Shores when I was a little girl.”

    Jessie wrinkled her nose and planted her hands on her slim hips. “But that was in the olden days. This is now.”

    Spoken like a true ten-year old. Barbara smiled in spite of her trembling insides.

    “It’s going to be all right, Jessica. It’s going to be all right.”

    “I’m scared, Mama.” I’ve been scared for a long time. Since Daddy got so weird.”

    Barbara scooted the chair back and pulled her pixie daughter into her lap. She hugged her slender body and stroked her soft, yellow, corn silk hair. Jessie cuddled into her.

    “I’ve been scared for a long time, too. But everything’s going to be all right now. And you’ll get to spend the rest of summer vacation in an inn that’s a lot nicer than this one-bedroom apartment. You’ll have a room of your own. Aunt Clover said so. We’re close to the ocean. There’s a beach. There’s a library and a movie theater and a park. An ice cream parlor with the best ice cream you’ve ever tasted.”

    “Are you sure it’s going to be that good?”

    “I’m sure, baby, I’m sure.”

    But right now, Barbara wasn’t sure of anything. It just had to be better. It had to.

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